The secret of the IQD’s value was Iraq’s gold

6-7-13 Eagle1: First of all, it is important to understand that the IQD undergirds in a major way this whole Global Currency Reset. Although the GCR (the Basel III Protocols) was first put into motion in 2002 — the so-called “Authors of the Plan” being mostly members of the Bush 43 Administration –

The Iraq War became a major boon because far-sighted visionaries in Bush’s cabinet foresaw the opportunity to utilize the IQD (which was operating under UN sanctions at the time due to Saddam Hussein’s adventures) as a crucial piece of the backbone for the GCR. The IQD had seen valuations in prior years which easily made it the most valuable currency in the world.

The secret of the IQD’s value was Iraq’s gold, silver, diamonds, and — to an increasingly petroleum hungry world — Iraq’s vast reserves of oil and natural gas.

The war in Iraq brought about discoveries of far more gold than anyone had imagined in veins that had never been tapped. Satellite reconnaissance additionally indicated the probability of far more oil than had been tapped.

We don’t need to rehash the appointment of Dr. Shabibi to take over the Central Bank, or his past labors as a renowned economist with both the UN and the IMF. We’ve all discussed more times than I can count the plan to bring the IQD back to world recognition and restoration of its value.

Let me get to the core of this argument. The simple reinstatement (RI) of the IQD all by itself (never mind revaluing it) with its gold-backing makes the currency become a credible reserve currency for many of the world’s currencies — notably the U.S. Dollar.

The gold that backs the IQD causes the IQD to become a worthwhile “gold certificate” which in turn takes the place of actual gold on deposit at Fort Knox. With the US Treasury holding literally trillions of IQD in its vaults, and holding onto it, it makes the IQD (at nothing more than reinstated value) a significant asset for backing the new USD.

The GCR does not call for “revalued” currencies in the strictest sense of the word. It calls for “asset-backing” to the world’s currencies — hence a “reset” of its value.

We generically refer to these baskets of currencies (as they are being restructured) as having been “revalued.” In many cases, these various currencies will see significant revaluations. In some cases, they will simply be “restructured” with little change in their trading value worldwide.

In still other cases, currencies will lose value simply because there is way too much of it printed and in circulation to properly support with available assets. The USD is a classic example of this. As is the case of a number of currencies, the USD will be “devalued.”

The upside to this devaluation is the fact that our dollar will now have real value to it.

The fact that it will have lost value in terms of actual numbers is offset by virtue of the fact that every single dollar in circulation will be supported by a combination of gold, silver, other precious metals, minerals, oil, natural gas, etc., means that we will no longer have “fiat money.”

The money will have some genuine worth to it and be recognized world-wide for what it used to be — the most stable currency in the world.

The GCR purposes to do that with every currency so that values are based on something (or “things”) that everyone agrees has some specified value.

Getting back to the question raised, “how can the IQD be in a basket when it has not even been reinstated?” the issue is not whether or not it has been reinstated. The question is, “how much value backs up the IQD” and “how do we set equitable worth for that currency.”

Those are the questions behind every single currency in each basket. It matters not whether the currency has been under program strictures or freely tradeable.

What matters is where it comes out when the basket is released by the IMF. In the case of currencies like the IQD, the VND, the IDR, etc., there are huge increases to be realized for those who have invested while the currencies were operating under program strictures.

As to the timing of the release of each basket, there are protocols in place which each currency must fulfill. The fluctuations you may have seen with some of the currencies in this first basket, for example, can be attributed to normal fluctuations, or — in the case of some, such as the Jordanian Dinar — preparatory moves.

Once again, I point out that with the restructuring that is taking place behind every currency, you may not necessarily see any major changes in that currency’s valuation. What you will see, when all is said and done, is a currency that has genuine value — a value that has been established on the basis of that particular nation’s ability to back with real, tradeable assets.

I trust this gives you a clearer picture of what is happening. We are in the midst of a change from “fiat” (meaning “stated or declared value,” irrespective of any actual intrinsic worth) currencies to monies that can be backed by something tangible, materially speaking, and not simply some country’s promise to pay whether it has the ability to do so or not.

That’s a discussion I could take much farther, but this is a good place to stop. Blessings on you.

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